COURSE DESCRIPTION

Law, or legal studies, comes into contact with almost every area of human life, touching upon issues relating to business, economics, politics, the environment, human rights, international relations and trade. It is telling that the first academic degrees developed were all related to law.

Law degrees have always been among the most sought-after and widely respected courses to study at university. For many, a law degree is the first step along the path to a career in the legal sector, often followed by the further study and training needed to become a practicing solicitor or barrister. However, this is certainly not the only reason to study law at university. Law degrees are notoriously challenging, and for many students, the attraction lies in the unique combination of human interest and intellectual stimulation provided.

As a law student, you can expect to learn how to tackle some of the most problematic – indeed, often seemingly irresolvable – conflicts and issues in modern society and morality. In providing a framework through which to examine and understand different societies and cultures, law degrees are a useful way to prepare not only for specific legal careers, but for a broad range of professional roles – and indeed, for life in general.

There are lots of different types of law degrees available, varying according to where you study. In most countries, law degrees take the form of an LLB (Bachelor of Laws) which allows you to go on to take the national Bar or Law Society qualifying examinations, in order to becoming a practicing lawyer. In some countries, a BA in Law (BL) or a BSc in Law is in place instead. Often, these alternative names are used interchangeably. However, some universities differentiate between LLB and BA Law programs, with the former focusing exclusively on law and the latter allowing students to take course modules in other subjects, with a focus on humanities.